Common name: Australian Bombardier Beetle
Scientific name: Pheropsophus vertalis

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Anthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Coleoptera
Family: Carabidae
Genus: Pheropsophus
Species: P. verticalis

 

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The Australian Bombardier Beetle is a very interesting animal because of it defense mechanism, that’s how they get their name. They mostly live in eastern Australia in river banks and floodplains. They hunt better at night and on the ground and trees. They are carnivores.  They eat  smaller insects. When startled they make a popping sound. Another defensive mechanism is they spray a type of chemical from there abdomen that is 100 digress celsius.

The Australian Bombardier Beetle is black and brown. Their wings are black and they have a brown spot in the middle which covers most of their back. No two beetles will have the same pattern on there wings. They also have a black spot on their head. They have six legs three on each side of the thorax. They can grow up to 12-18mm.

Their population is increasing. There are more than 2,500 species of them. They  live in the floodplain and river banks. They hunt better a night, on the ground and trees. They are carnivorous and they can be vary viscous.  They eat smaller bugs , but they also get hunted by bigger bugs and small animals. They are part of the Family Carabidae which is a ground beetle.
Their defense mechanism is very interesting. When they are threaten they will make a loud pop sound so it will startle the predator so they have enough time to escape. Another way is that they can spray a type of chemical called hydrogen peroxide, which it will burn the insect with 100 degrees celsius.

As you can see, the Australian Bombardier Beetle is a very interesting insect from its defense mechanism to its habitat. Their population is increasing. They live in eastern Australia. They are carnivorous and aggressive. They eat small bugs and they get hunted by bigger bugs and small animals.

Author: Joseph N 
Published: 01/2013

 

Sources: www. Australian museum.net.au/BombordierBeetle

www.botanical.com/insects/Bombordier beetle

World Book Encyclopedia volume B

Photo Credit: 

http://www.bowerbird.org.au/observations/55552